About Costumes

From a book of Marta Čížková – The Haná Region Costume – edited in Prostějov 1940

A part of an introductory text, written by dr. Jan Kuehndel

(A former director of Regional Museum Prostějov) :

Every costume reflects its period and its region, its land and its people. It describes a peasant, his work and his enjoyment. You can see it specially at the Haná region costume. You can find a wealth of Haná region and its fertile soil. The Haná costumes sing about a physical ability of Haná men and attractive Haná women. You can feel a sense of traditions and joyful folklor coming from them.

Several sections from the book of Mrs. Čížková :

… Haná region is a heart of Moravia and Haná costume is a crown of Moravian ones. Especially a woman version, with a richly decorated hat of bride.

… In 1858 Jewish businessman Mandl living in Prostějov founded a factory for a production of clothing . Cheap ready-made clothes consequently pushed out the traditional costumes. First from the area around Prostějov town, then from the other parts of Haná region, as well.

Haná costumes had been worn all over the Haná region – which reperesents the whole Central Moravia, from Uničov to Bílovice (North – South) and from Litovel to Holešov (West – East). There were typical differences in costume detailes for every period :in Renaissance – collar and sleeves, in Rococo large skirts and deeply cut out camisoles, in Empire – high belts and so on. Period changes in design of costumes had not been usually spread out all over Haná region immediately and had not been fully accepted at all places – that was why Haná costumes were multiform and a bit different from one part of Haná region to another.

… Every larger village used to have a tailor who was trained in an embroidery, as well. There were handy women there, able to sew and embroider costumes for living. On Sunday afternoons young girls often had not had better enjoyment than the embroidery. They were willing to do it even for contest – who from them was better and faster. At the same time they had narrated old stories or sang songs.

… Married women were not allowed to let their hair to be visible. It was a great shame if it happened. Their kerchiefs had to be fastened precisely and had to cover their hair completely. In Summer time and during the work married women used to wear a knitted decorated hat instead of the kerchief.

… The Haná dressy girls were proud of large, decorated and speciously formed sleeves. They had usually had severaly of them, even six pairs. In Winter time they used to maintain them carefully as in Summer time there was no time to do such a job due to a hard work on fields. There were several folk songs about the maintainance of costumes and relations between girls and boys.

The main topic of these songs was mostly love, as you can imagine …

Embroideries

An extract from a book “Hanácká lidová výšivka” (Folk Embroidery of Haná Region) written by PhDr. Miroslav Válka and published by Museum of Kroměříž District in 1985:
Folk embroideries in their original purpose were closely related both to an ordinary and a festal clothing of people in the country. On Haná folk costumes they are used on numerous clothing pieces that can be (according to the type of ground textile) divided as follows:
1. pieces made from linen, decorated by pre-drawn embroidery coloured in beige. yellow, white and black.
2. pieces made from woollen cloth and leather, decorated by coloured embroidery
The top quality of Haná embroideries can be seen on large pieces called “úvodnice” (they are of a length 200 – 250 cm), that were used as a part of wedding clothing of brides and in young mothers during a delivery and a puerperium.

From a book of Marta Čížková – The Haná Region Costume – edited in Prostějov 1940
Haná costumes had been worn all over the Haná region – which reperesents the whole Central Moravia, from Uničov to Bílovice (North – South) and from Litovel to Holešov (West – East). There were typical differences in costume detailes for every period : in Renaissance – collar and sleeves, in Rococo large skirts and deeply cut out camisoles, in Empire – high belts and so on. Period changes in design of costumes had not been usually spread out all over Haná region immediately and had not been fully accepted at all places – that was why Haná costumes were multiform and a bit different from one part of Haná region to another.
Every larger village used to have a tailor who was trained in an embroidery, as well. There were handy women there, able to sew and embroider costumes for living. On Sunday afternoons young girls often had not had better enjoyment than the embroidery. They were willing to do it even for contest – who from them was better and faster. At the same time they had narrated old stories or sang songs.

embroidery 1 embroidery 2 embroidery 3 embroidery 4 embroidery 5 embroidery 6 embroidery 7 embroidery 8 embroidery 9 embroidery 10